panologic
3 days ago
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July Garden

Stu McGregor

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5 days ago
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foxmouth:

Landscapes, 2014 | by Anthony Samaniego
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Sunset captured at Caldecotte Lake, Bucks, UK Photos by Stu McGregor
panologic.tumblr.com panologic.kinja.com

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deeplovephotography:

Vancouver Island Infrared (5/10)portfolio | flickr | facebook | society6

deeplovephotography:

Vancouver Island Infrared (5/10)

portfolio
| flickr | facebook | society6
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1. View of Ben Nevis Range from the river Lochy, Fort William, UK.

2 & 3. Wavendon Woods, Bucks, UK.

Photos by Stu McGregor
panologic.tumblr.com panologic.kinja.com
1 month ago
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ohstarstuff:

IO: ONE OF THE STRANGEST PLACES IN THE SOLAR SYSTEM

  • Io’s colors derive from sulfur and molten silicate rock 
  • A bit larger than Earth’s Moon, Io is the third largest of Jupiter’s moons, and the fifth one in distance from the planet. 
  • Io’s mountains are much taller than those on Earth, reaching heights of 16 kilometers (52,000 feet). 
  • The unusual surface of Io is kept very young by its system of active volcanoes. In fact, it’s the most volcanically active body in the solar system 
  • The intense tidal gravity of Jupiter stretches Io and the resulting friction greatly heats Io’s interior, causing molten rock to explode through the surface. 
  • Io’s volcanoes are so active that they are effectively turning the whole moon inside out. Some of Io’s volcanic lava is so hot it glows in the dark. 
  • Volcanic plumes rise 300 km (190 miles) above the surface, with material spewing out at nearly half the required escape velocity. 
  • Io can develop 400,000 volts across itself and create an electric current of 3 million amperes. This current takes the path of least resistance along Jupiter’s magnetic field lines to the planet’s surface, creating lightning in Jupiter’s upper atmosphere. 
  • As Jupiter rotates, it takes its magnetic field around with it, sweeping past Io and stripping off about 1,000 kg (1 ton) of Io’s material every second! This material becomes ionized in the magnetic field and forms a doughnut-shaped cloud of intense radiation referred to as a plasma torus. Some of the ions are pulled into Jupiter’s atmosphere along the magnetic lines of force and create auroras in the planet’s upper atmosphere. It is the ions escaping from this torus that inflate Jupiter’s magnetosphere to over twice as big as expected.

    Source: 
    http://solarsystem.nasa.gov/
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1 month ago
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rtamerica:

Scientists work on ‘quantum superclock’ to reveal mysteries of time itself
Physicists say they believe they’re on track to creating a “quantum superclock” that would revolutionize the way the world tells time.
If the work proves to be a success, than the concept of time as it’s currently understood could be changed drastically and allow a whole new idea of accuracy to prevail.

rtamerica:

Scientists work on ‘quantum superclock’ to reveal mysteries of time itself

Physicists say they believe they’re on track to creating a “quantum superclock” that would revolutionize the way the world tells time.

If the work proves to be a success, than the concept of time as it’s currently understood could be changed drastically and allow a whole new idea of accuracy to prevail.

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1 month ago
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spaceplasma:

A Stellar Discovery on the Milky Way’s Far Side

A single Hubble Space Telescope image can capture scores of distant galaxies, but the one galaxy we’ll never see from the outside is our own. As a result, no one knows the Milky Way’s exact size and shape. It took more than a century after the discovery of the first spiral in space before astronomers established that our galaxy is a spiral, too, and more years elapsed before they deduced that we inhabit a barred spiral—a type whose bright central region is elongated. Now, for the first time, observers have detected five Cepheids (yellow dots at top) on the far side of the galaxy that serve as outstanding yardsticks, a feat which will divulge secrets about the Milky Way’s terra incognita. (view full size image)

Full Article
Credit: Ken Croswell, NASA/JPL-Caltech/R. Hurt, SSC-Caltech, Ariel Weiss 

spaceplasma:

A Stellar Discovery on the Milky Way’s Far Side

A single Hubble Space Telescope image can capture scores of distant galaxies, but the one galaxy we’ll never see from the outside is our own. As a result, no one knows the Milky Way’s exact size and shape. It took more than a century after the discovery of the first spiral in space before astronomers established that our galaxy is a spiral, too, and more years elapsed before they deduced that we inhabit a barred spiral—a type whose bright central region is elongated. Now, for the first time, observers have detected five Cepheids (yellow dots at top) on the far side of the galaxy that serve as outstanding yardsticks, a feat which will divulge secrets about the Milky Way’s terra incognita. (view full size image)

Credit: Ken Croswell, NASA/JPL-Caltech/R. Hurt, SSC-Caltech, Ariel Weiss 

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